ERGONOMIC...
The term �ergonomics� is derived from two Greek words: �ergon�, meaning work and �nomoi�, meaning natural laws. Ergonomists study human capabilities in relationship to work demands.

POSTURE...
In recent years, ergonomists have attempted to define postures which minimize unnecessary static work and reduce the forces acting on the body. All of us could significantly reduce our risk of injury if we could adhere to the following ergonomic principles:

  • All work activities should permit the worker to adopt several different, but equally healthy and safe postures
  • Where muscular force has to be exerted it should be done by the largest appropriate muscle groups available.
  • Work activities should be performed with the joints at about mid-point of their range of movement. This applies particularly to the head, trunk, and upper limbs.

THE PROBLEM...
Here, however, we arrive at a serious problem - and a challenge to conventional ergonomic thinking: In order to put these recommendations into practice, a person would have to be a skilled observer of his or her own joint and muscle functioning and would have to be able to change his or her posture to a healthier one at will. No one develops this sort of highly refined sensory awareness without special training. Therefore, in order to derive the benefits of ergonomic research, we must learn how to observe our bodies in a new way.* Any attempt to improve workplace conditions can have only limited success if this issue is ignored.

A SOLUTION...
To promote an exceptionally healthy and productive work environment and makes our lives easier, it is recommended that we take advantage of the innovative and ergonomic products out in the market today. These products encourage a good and an upright posture, that provides correct spine & lumbar positioning and longer comfort throughout a busy work-day.